Lavish Living

Apr 22

starlorde:

starlorde:

au where bucky/the winter soldier is stitch and steve is lilo

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(Source: jasonlasers, via turnpikedarling)

Anonymous asked: Why does Chris Evans always grab his left boob when he laughs?

officialchelso:

Hello, anon, and thank you for the question.

This topic has been studied by by researchers for years. There are three prevailing theories that I will relay to you now.

1. It keeps him on the ground.

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You may notice in the gif above that Chris’ leg starts to rise as he laughs, possibly a precursor to his entire body undergoing a sort of lift off due to his joy. Chris then employs his upper body strength to force himself to obey the laws of gravity.

2. To check on his physique.

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As you may be aware, anon, it takes a lot of hard work to maintain a superhero body. Chris is concerned that in the time he has spent sitting down, sans working out or eating, he has lost muscle mass. Understandably, he feels the need to make sure that he is still a specimen.

3. Object permanence.

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Object permanence is a term applied to the understanding that an object still exists even when you cannot see it. Chris closes his eyes when he laughs, making him unable to see that he has not disappeared. By grabbing his left boob, Chris knows that he has not somehow ceased to exist.

I hope this helps.

Click here to support Medical Bills for Extensive Surgery by Dustin Beth -

alakeeffectgirl:

Justin is my co-worker here at UWP. Several weeks ago he was working on his car in the neighboring apartment complex when the jack gave way and the car fell, landing on his face and chest. He suffered extensive facial injuries and was taken to the hospital by Flight for Life. I’m trying to share this link as many places as I can in order to help Justin raise money for his medical bills. He’s a great guy and has been a valued member of our department. Please help if you can, even just by sharing this link/post!

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shananaomi:

The Denver Principles were written in 1983 by the People with AIDS caucus—11 gay men with AIDS from around the country—during the fifth annual Gay and Lesbian Health Conference, held that year in Denver..
As my friend Sean Strub recounts in his excellent memoir, Body Counts:




As the conference was wrapping up, the eleven manifesto co-authors stormed the plenary stage behind a banner that read “Fighting for Our Lives.” They took the microphone and read the manifesto to a stone-silent convention hall. According to media reports at the time, at the end of the presentation, “there wasn’t a dry eye in the house,” and the audience gave them a standing ovation that lasted nearly fifteen minutes. 
The concepts expressed in the Denver Principles manifesto weren’t new—to a large extent, they were an embodiment of feminist health principles—but it was radical for a group of people who shared a disease to organize politically to assert their right to a voice in the public-policy decision-making that would so profoundly affect their lives. Never in the history of humanity had this occurred; for people with AIDS, the Denver Principles document is the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Magna Carta all rolled into one. 
The Denver Principles defined the philosophical underpinnings of the self-empowerment movement for the AIDS epidemic and the network of service providers we created. It also quickly became a model for organizing by those with other chronic health conditions in the U.S. and around the world. 




I am truly excited to see The Normal Heart get all the publicity in the world, including Matt Bomer also appearing on the cover of Details this month. But some of the language used in their piece is offensive, outdated and insulting. At best, I’d guess it’s a badly executed attempt at clever wordplay, but it still reminded me that I really want to post some additional historical context for the early AIDS epidemic here, too. 
Image via ACT UP.

shananaomi:

The Denver Principles were written in 1983 by the People with AIDS caucus—11 gay men with AIDS from around the country—during the fifth annual Gay and Lesbian Health Conference, held that year in Denver..

As my friend Sean Strub recounts in his excellent memoir, Body Counts:

As the conference was wrapping up, the eleven manifesto co-authors stormed the plenary stage behind a banner that read “Fighting for Our Lives.” They took the microphone and read the manifesto to a stone-silent convention hall. According to media reports at the time, at the end of the presentation, “there wasn’t a dry eye in the house,” and the audience gave them a standing ovation that lasted nearly fifteen minutes.

The concepts expressed in the Denver Principles manifesto weren’t new—to a large extent, they were an embodiment of feminist health principles—but it was radical for a group of people who shared a disease to organize politically to assert their right to a voice in the public-policy decision-making that would so profoundly affect their lives. Never in the history of humanity had this occurred; for people with AIDS, the Denver Principles document is the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Magna Carta all rolled into one.

The Denver Principles defined the philosophical underpinnings of the self-empowerment movement for the AIDS epidemic and the network of service providers we created. It also quickly became a model for organizing by those with other chronic health conditions in the U.S. and around the world. 

I am truly excited to see The Normal Heart get all the publicity in the world, including Matt Bomer also appearing on the cover of Details this month. But some of the language used in their piece is offensive, outdated and insulting. At best, I’d guess it’s a badly executed attempt at clever wordplay, but it still reminded me that I really want to post some additional historical context for the early AIDS epidemic here, too. 

Image via ACT UP.

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mamaliza:

It started with the thought that Marvel Studios probably cast their movies by asking previous cast members if they knew anyone who needed work. It snowballed when I hit IMDb. And it got out of hand when allecto joined up. The net result? 52 MCU actors (and three directors), joined through non Marvel movies. Zoomable at bubbl.us.

Holy. Crapballs.

mamaliza:

It started with the thought that Marvel Studios probably cast their movies by asking previous cast members if they knew anyone who needed work. It snowballed when I hit IMDb. And it got out of hand when allecto joined up. The net result? 52 MCU actors (and three directors), joined through non Marvel movies. Zoomable at bubbl.us.

Holy. Crapballs.

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